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The 10 Best Mics For Bass Amps for you in 2023

Hatune Foundation
  Feb 4, 2023 11:20 AM

Here we have the 10 Best Mics For Bass Amps just for you in 2023. These products are picked through many researches of our team, guarantee to bring the most satisfying options to the table.


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Overview

It's no secret that bass amps need good mics to capture the tone of the instrument. But with so many different mic options on the market, it can be tough to decide which one is right for you. In this blog post, we'll take a look at some of the best mics for bass amps and help you choose the right one for your needs. So whether you're a professional musician or just stARTing, read on to find out more!


Buying Guide

Type of mic

The first thing to consider when choosing a mic for your bass amp is the type of mic you need. There are two main types of microphones: dynamic and condenser. Dynamic microphones are better for live performances, as they can handle high volumes without distortion. Condenser microphones are better for recording, as they capture more detail and nuance.

If you're mostly using your bass amp for live performances, then a dynamic mic is a good option. However, if you're using your amp for recording as well, then a condenser mic is a better choice.

Pickup pattern

Another important consideration when choosing a mic for your bass amp is the pickup pattern. The three main pickup patterns are omnidirectional, unidirectional, and bidirectional.

Omnidirectional microphones pick up sound from all directions, making them great for capturing the full range of the bass amp's sound. Unidirectional microphones only pick up sound from one direction, making them ideal for isolating the bass sound. Bidirectional microphones pick up sound from two directions, making them great for capturing both the bass and the amp's sound.

When choosing a pickup pattern, it's important to consider how you'll be using the mic. If you're mostly using your bass amp for live performances, then an omnidirectional mic is a good option. If you're using your amp for recording, then a unidirectional or bidirectional mic is a better choice.

Frequency response

Another important consideration when choosing a mic for your bass amp is the frequency response. The frequency response is the range of frequencies that the mic can pick up. Wider frequency response will capture more of the bass sound, while a narrower frequency response will capture less of the bass sound.

When choosing a frequency response, it's important to consider how you'll be using the mic. If you're mostly using your bass amp for live performances, then a wider frequency response is a good option. If you're using your amp for recording, then a narrower frequency response is a better choice.

Size and weight

The last thing to consider when choosing a mic for your bass amp is the size and weight of the mic. If you're using your bass amp for live performances, then a smaller and lighter mic is a good option. If you're using your amp for recording, then a larger and heavier mic is a better choice.

When choosing a size and weight, it's important to consider how you'll be using the mic. If you're mostly using your bass amp for live performances, then a smaller and lighter mic is a good option. If you're using your amp for recording, then a larger and heavier mic is a better choice.


Reviews

Shure Beta 52A

Shure is a major player in the pro-audio sector, especially when it comes to dynamic microphones. The SM57 and SM58 dynamic mics have been staples of the recording and live sound industries for years.

The BETA series is an upgrade of these models as well as numerous others (such as the old Shure SM91, now the BETA 91a). There's no SM52 either. That isn't a problem, since the BETA 52a works just fine on its own. In addition, it does much more than that.

It's a work of art that it's ridiculous. Aside from the fact that it's devilishly attractive, the BETA 52a has other desirable features. The frequency response, for example, is ideal for micing up a bass cabinet.

With this microphone, you may capture bass sounds down to the lowest of the lows, with a sharp boost around 5kHz and an aggressive drop-off above 7kHz. This means you'll get everything from your bass amp, and nothing else.

The proximity effect is significant, so you'll want to consider your mic placement carefully. When the microphone is right up against the cab, the lows (around 40Hz) have a 15dB boost, compared to a response of around -5dB when the microphone is 2 feet away from the amplifier.

To give you an idea of how loud it is, a jet engine at 3 feet is roughly 150 decibels SPL. A 10dB increase in volume is considered to be a perceived doubling in volume, which implies 170dB would be interpreted as four times louder than the 150dB SPL jet engine.

Pros

  • Ideal frequency response for bass cabs

  • Attractive design

  • Can handle high SPL levels

Cons

  • The proximity effect is significant

Bottom line

The Shure BETA 52a is a great option for micing up a bass cabinet. It has an ideal frequency response for capturing the low end of the bass sound and can handle high SPL levels. The proximity effect is significant, so you'll need to be careful with mic placement.

Sennheiser e902

The Sennheiser e902 is a fantastic choice for miking a bass cabinet. It has a broad frequency response that captures the low end of the bass sound, and it can withstand high SPL levels.

It's a fantastic bass guitar amp microphone, with a frequency response that extends down to around 40Hz, and like the BETA 52a, it features a strong peak in the mid-treble. This makes it ideal for capturing the honk and grind typically associated with bass playing.

The e902 is a large-diaphragm dynamic microphone that's ideal for recording bass guitar amps. It's also a fantastic option for recording kick drums and low-tuned toms. The sound of this mic is fantastic. Not only does the bass response meet expectations, but it also has a very fast attack that captures the subtleties of slap bass techniques, as well as a hum-canceling coil to reduce internal noise.

With a sturdy metal body, the Sennheiser e902 is perfect for the touring musician or live sound engineers who need to withstand the stress of life on the road. It's also a great option for the studio engineer who wants a high-quality bass guitar mic that will last for years.

The capsule is internally shock-mounted for accuracy and has a clear, punchy low end. It would also make an excellent recording microphone for guitar amp duties, particularly if you're recording low-tuned guitars like those seen in many modern heavy metal recordings.

Pros

  • Wide frequency response

  • Can handle high SPL levels

  • Sturdy metal body

  • Shock-mounted capsule for accuracy

Cons

  • The proximity effect is significant

Bottom line

The Sennheiser e902 is a great option for micing up a bass cabinet. It has a wide frequency response that captures the low end of the bass sound and can handle high SPL levels. The proximity effect is significant, so you'll need to be careful with mic placement.

Shure SM57

This is one of the most popular microphones in the world and for good reason. The Shure SM57 is an incredibly versatile microphone that can be used for a wide range of applications.

One of its most popular uses is for miking up a bass cabinet. The SM57 has a frequency response that's been specifically designed for capturing the low end of the bass sound. It's also a great choice for miking up guitar amps, particularly if you're looking for a more aggressive sound.

The SM57 is a dynamic microphone, and as such, it can handle high SPL levels. This makes it a great choice for use in live settings. The microphone is also very rugged, making it ideal for use on the road.

The SM57 has a broad frequency response, with audio from 40Hz to well below the Nyquist frequency. If you're recording a particularly low-tuned bass guitar, you may wish to complement this SM57 with a DI (more on that later). It does an excellent job of capturing the higher mid-range frequencies that allow the bass guitar to cut through in a mix, with strong boosts from 5kHz up.

The capsule is internally shock-mounted for accuracy and has a clear, punchy low end. It would also make an excellent recording microphone for guitar amp duties, particularly if you're recording low-tuned guitars like those seen in many modern heavy metal recordings.

Pros

  • Frequency response specifically designed for bass

  • Can handle high SPL levels

  • Rugged and durable

Cons

  • It's a bit pricey

Bottom line

The Shure SM57 is one of the most popular microphones in the world, and for good reason. It's an incredibly versatile microphone that can be used for a wide range of applications. The frequency response is specifically designed for capturing the low end of the bass sound, and it can handle high SPL levels. If you're looking for a durable, rugged microphone that will last for years, the SM57 is a great choice.

Shure PGA 48

This mic is a budget-friendly option that still delivers excellent sound quality. The Shure PGA 48 is a great choice for miking up a bass cabinet. It lacks a bit of low end, so you may want to add some of that with a DI recording. It does, however, have a lot of high-end presence, thus the Shure PGA48 is an excellent choice on a tight budget if you're looking for something to capture a bass guitar tone with plenty of bites.

The audio is quite good, but you might think twice about bringing this one on the road. It's not that it can't handle it, just that less expensive microphones are known to be a tiny less durable than their more expensive counterparts.

The frequency response is tailored for bass, with a little bit of a boost around 5kHz. The proximity effect is significant, so you'll need to be careful with mic placement.

About the only other thing to mention is that the PGA48 has a cardioid pattern, which means it's less likely to pick up bleed from other instruments. This can be good or bad, depending on your needs. If you're recording a live band and want to avoid bleeding, this is a great choice. If you have an amp in a room with poor acoustics, however, you may want a microphone with a wider pick-up pattern.

Pros

  • Budget-friendly

  • Cardioid pattern minimizes bleed

Cons

  • Less low end than some other options

Bottom line

The Shure PGA 48 is a great choice for miking up a bass cabinet. It lacks a bit of low end, so you may want to add some of that with a DI recording. It does, however, have a lot of high-end presence, thus the Shure PGA48 is an excellent choice on a tight budget if you're looking for something to capture a bass guitar tone with plenty of bites.

AKG D112 MkII

The K52 LE's D112 is frequently compared to Shure's BETA 52a for kick drum and bass amp microphone use. However, the D112 falls short in the looks department. Yes, I'm a fan of the BETA 52a; get over it.

The D112's unusual green plastic front basket and ragged rear head contribute to its unique appearance as well as distinct sound. It performs almost everything you'd want from a bass amp microphone, including high SPL capability, broad frequency response, and incredible durability.

The D112's unique frequency response helps it to reproduce the low-end thump of a bass amp while still providing plenty of presence and attack. Although it's not as extended in the low end as the BETA 52a, it's still more than adequate for most applications.

The proximity effect is significant, so you'll need to be careful with mic placement. About the only other thing to mention is that the D112 has a cardioid pattern, which means it's less likely to pick

Pros

  • High SPL capability

  • Broad frequency response

  • Incredible durability

Cons

  • Some may not like the unique appearance

Bottom line

The AKG D112 MkII is a great choice for miking up a bass cabinet. It lacks a bit of low end, so you may want to add some of that with a DI recording. It does, however, have a lot of high-end presence, thus the AKG D112 MkII is an excellent choice on a tight budget if you're looking for something to capture a bass guitar tone with plenty of bites.


FAQs

Why is a bass amp mic important?

A bass amp mic is important because it allows you to capture the low-end thump of a bass amp while still providing plenty of presence and attack.

Do I need a DI box when recording bass?

No, you don't need a DI box when recording bass. However, if you want to add some low-end to your recordings, you may want to consider using one.

Does an expensive bass amp mic sound better?

Not necessarily. Less expensive microphones are known to be a tiny less durable than their more expensive counterparts. However, the audio quality is often just as good.


Conclusion

If you’re looking for the best mic for bass amps, our top pick is the Shure PGA 48. It’s a professional-grade mic that can handle high sound pressure levels and deliver clear, punchy audio. Plus, it’s relatively affordable, making it a great option for budget-minded musicians.

Bass amps are an important part of any musician's rig, and the right mic can make all the difference in terms of getting your bass sound just right. We've looked at some of the best mics for bass amps on the market today, and we hope you'll find this information helpful as you start shopping for your next piece of gear. Thanks for reading!